Bamboo Housing Project Can Become a Natural Disaster Relief

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With the destruction in Haiti comes the need to build housing that can stand up to such natural disasters and not collapse under their destructive nature. St Val Architect studio has designed eco-friendly houses for the Port au Prince, housing project.

The design takes inspiration from the traditional art of bamboo baskets. These baskets are generally shaped like a cocoon and are weaved from natural plant fibers available locally.

Green Houses

These green houses are contributing towards the reconstruction work in Haiti. They adhere to the green concept right down to their building material.

These residential units are being built with a view towards minimum adverse effects for the structural density in the area. The building materials have been sourced locally too.

Similar naturally sustainable house designs are under study for the tsunami prone regions of South East Asia. The Geiger Research Institute of Sustainable Building is creating a prototype of this bamboo housing structure.

These are made from low cost locally procured materials. They are being designed to survive hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunami.

Built entirely of bamboo, including the foundation, the houses promise to give maximum space to the families at the minimum costs and hopefully also minimize the destruction caused by the angry elements of nature.

The prototype will be a two level housing unit with two independent units that will share utility areas and stairs. The house has cooking, dining and socializing areas. The upper floor, about eight feet from ground has bedrooms and a continuous running verandah all around.

The lower level is built only two steps up from the ground level, and is built on a fill pad that is retained by sand bags.

Right from the foundation to the two units, the house uses locally procured, natural and low cost materials like sandbags, bamboo culms, studs, top plate and sole plates, wood dowels and bags filled with rice hull.

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